Mother of dismembered Calgary woman talks missing and murdered indigenous women

Posted August 24th, 2019 by admin and filed in 长沙夜网
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WARNING: This story contains graphic content. Discretion is advised.

Stephanie English was devastated in June when news of her daughter’s death shook her family. The body of 25-year-old Joey English was discovered in a treed area in Calgary, but some of her body parts have still not been found.

“My grandchildren are motherless. The justice system is failing us. Promises are being broken,” English said.

“I don’t understand. What more can we do?”

ChangSha Night Net

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    “I haven’t had closure for my daughter. I’m still waiting to bring her home – her body parts are still in the landfill,” English said.

    The death is an example of what is being called a crisis in Canada by organizers of Sisters in Spirit vigils.

    October 4 is a day of vigils in over 50 communities remembering missing and murdered indigenous women and girls and working towards a solution.

    READ MORE: MMIW inquiry chief commissioner worries expectations won’t be met

    University of Lethbridge natives studies professor Dr. Linda Many Guns believes the government’s national inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women and girls is missing the mark.

    “The questions that are being asked aren’t about identifying bodies, they were about: who are the perpetrators?” Many Guns said.

    “The focus needs to be on developing a system that’s going to stop the murders rather than just identifying the people that are missing.”

    WATCH: Missing and murdered indigenous women remembered at Lethbridge vigil

    English and her family spoke publicly about Joey’s death Tuesday morning at a special presentation at the University of Lethbridge. While she was filled with so much heartache, there was a heavy emphasis on the future.

    “We have to stand together as one for that to change. It just takes one person, but a lot of support to stand behind that one person to change those laws,” English said.

    READ MORE: Global’s continuing coverage of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls

    “We are all created as one person, one human being. Let’s treat everybody the same,” Joey’s grandmother Patsy English said.

    A candlelight vigil is being held at 7 p.m., Oct. 4 in Galt Gardens to honour murdered and missing aboriginal women and girls.

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